Edu

Education Department

For a B.S. degree in Interdisciplinary Studies in Education, students are required to complete 120 semester credit hours: 36 credits in general education, 36 credits in education core courses, and 48 credits in concentration core courses including electives.

The program offers students pursuing a B.S. degree in Interdisciplinary Studies in Education three concentrations to choose from: Mathematics, English Language Arts/Reading, and Elementary Education.

Degree Requirements

The Department of Education provides students with a high-quality education that enables them to prepare curricula, design and deliver instruction with state-of-the-art instructional technology, communicate with parents and students, and effectively manage classrooms based on knowledge of human development, learning environments, and cognitive and behavioral models. Our graduates will also develop appropriate content knowledge and skills with an ability to recognize ethical issues in their professions.

  • COMM 1311 Fundamentals of Communication
  • ENGL 1311 Comp. & Rhetoric I
  • ENGL 1312 Comp. & Rhetoric II
  • MATH 1311 College Algebra
  • GEOL 1411 Earth Science/or
  • PHYS 1411/or
  • CHEM 1411/or
  • BIOL 1411
  • PHIL 1311 Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking
  • ARTS 1311 Art Appreciation
  • ETHC 1211 Professional Ethics
  • HIST 1311 U.S. History I/or HIST 2312/orHIST 2313
  • 6 credits form this list: GOVT 2311/or GOVT 3312/or ECON 2311/or ECON 2312/or PSYC 2311/or SOCI 2311/or GEOG 2312
  • COMP 1314 Computer Literacy and Application
  • EDUC 2311 Introduction to Teaching Profession
  • EDUC 2312 Learning Theories and Development
  • EDUC 3314 Classroom Management
  • EDUC 3315 Curriculum and Instructional Design
  • EDUC 3316 Integrating Technology into the Curriculum
  • EDUC 3317 Education in Culturally Diverse Environments
  • EDUC 4318 Education of the Exceptional Children
  • EDUC 4320 Issues in Secondary Schools – Reform, Law and Ethics
  • EDUC 4321 Measurement and Assessment in Education
  • EDUC 4323 Reading in Content Areas
  • EDUC 4699 Student Teaching
  • MATH 1313 Pre-Calculus
  • MATH 2314 Calculus I
  • MATH 2315 Calculus II
  • MATH 2316 Linear Algebra
  • MATH 2317 Discrete Mathematics
  • MATH 3318 Geometry and Trigonometry for Teachers
  • MATH 3319 Statistics and Probability
  • MATH 3320 Differential Equation
  • MATH 3322 Teaching Problem Solving in Math
  • MATH 4324 Teaching Secondary School Math
  • MATH 2325 History of Mathematics
  • MATH 3326 Introduction to Number Theory
  • MATH 3327 Integrating Technology in Math Education
  • Elective I
  • Elective II
  • Elective II
  • GOVT 3312 U.S. Government II
  • HIST 2312 U.S. History II
  • HIST 2313 Western Civilization
  • HIST 3314 History of Texas
  • GEOG 2311 Introduction to Human Geography
  • GEOG 2312 Regional Geography of the World
  • GEOG 3313 Geography of US and Canada
  • PSYC 2311 General Psychology
  • SOCI 2311 Introduction to Sociology
  • ECON 2312 Principles of Microeconomics
  • SOCS 4311 Concepts for Teaching Social Science
  • Elective I
  • Elective II
  • Elective III
  • Elective IV
  • Elective V
  • ENGL 2313 Introduction to Writing
  • ENGL 2314 Introduction to Literature
  • ENGL 3315 Survey of British Literature I
  • ENGL 2316 Survey of American Literature
  • ENGL 3317 Survey of British Literature II
  • ENGL 2319 Survey of World Literature
  • ENGL 3320 Issues in Composition Secondary Classroom
  • ENGL 3321 Professional Report Writing
  • ENGL 3322 Studies in Linguistics and History of the English Language
  • ENGL 3323 Teaching Grammar, Composition, Spelling, and Listening
  • ENGL 4324 Reading and Writing in the Secondary Schools
  • Elective I
  • Elective II
  • Elective III
  • Elective IV
  • Elective V

Course Descriptions

Note: C. 4. (3-2) means: This course is a 4 credits course. The first digit in the parenthesis represents the lecture hours per week. The second digit the parenthesis shows the lab hours per week. For example, Cr. 4. (3-2) means that this course is 4 credit ant 3 lecture hours per week and 2 lab hours per week, i.e., this course has a total of 45 lecture hours and 30 lab hours.

ENGL R300 Basic Writing
Cr. 0. (3-0).This course will help students to develop and improve the writing skills needed for successful completion of university-level work. This course focuses on academic writing. It provides strategies for improving content, organization, voice, reading to write, and editing in analytical essays and reports. Prerequisite: None

ENGL R301 Development of Reading Skills
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course offers intensive instruction in fundamental reading skills. This course focuses on improving reading and comprehension skills by developing university-level vocabulary and active reading strategies such as previewing, organizing information, analyzing structure, and identifying main ideas and supporting details. Prerequisite: None

ENGL 1311 Composition and Rhetoric I
Cr. 3. (3-3-0). This course is designed to help students practice the fundamentals of the writing process in personal and expository writing. Emphasis is on developing essays, writing for a particular audience, evaluating, analyzing, revising and editing texts. Prerequisite: None

ENGL 1312 Composition and Rhetoric II
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course offers continued development of writing skills and development of academic writing, with emphasis on literary analysis, expository and persuasive essays, study of research methods and materials, and preparation of research papers. Prerequisite: ENGL 1311

ENGL 2313 Introduction to Writing
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course offers continued development of writing skills and development of academic writing, with emphasis on technical communications, various forms of business correspondence, basic procedures for research writing, creative and critical essay writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 2314 Introduction to Literature
Cr. 3. (3-3-0). This course introduces poetry writing with emphasis on its forms and distinctive characteristics. The course will include poets from several different historical periods in which English verse has been composed, and poets from the diverse national/ethnic groups who have written in English. Students will be introduced to analyzing and writing about literature, focusing on the genres of fiction, non-fiction and drama. Students will learn techniques for reading analytically and critically and for writing critical/research papers on fiction, non-fiction and drama. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 2315 Survey of British Literature I
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on the study of the literature of the Ancient, the Middle Ages and the longer English Renaissance, including the 17th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 2316 Survey of American Literature
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on the study of the American literature from 1820 to 1865, including the birth of Romanticism, Transcendentalism, the slave narrative, and the abolitionist and woman’s suffrage movement; from 1865 to 1914: an investigation of the ways in which mainstream and marginalized writers responded to post-Civil-War changes and conditions, including the literary movements of realism, naturalism, regionalism, and “local color.” This course also introduces the American literature of the modern period (1914-1945): poetry and prose that range from the experimentalism of elitist art to immigrant stories to hardboiled detective fiction, as well as the developments in North American literature from the nineteen-fifties to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 3317 Survey of British Literature II
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on the study of the literature of the longer eighteenth century and nineteen century, from the Restoration to the French Revolution as well as the reign of Queen Victoria. This course also covers the period of the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 2319 Survey of World Literature
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on a cross-cultural survey of 20th century literature from Latin America, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the United States. It includes the  reading and discussion of major modern novelists who have influenced the form and content of other writers. Analysis of the writing and sociological, political, and historical contexts of the authors. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 3320 Issues in Composition Secondary Classroom
Cr. 3. (3-3-0). This course introduces students to the theoretical basis for and practical applications of cutting-edge instructional methods in Secondary School English Language Arts. The course focuses on how to plan curriculum units that integrate skills instruction in the areas of reading (both literature and non-fiction texts), writing (both expository and creative), speaking/listening, critical thinking, creative performance and media communications. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 3321 Professional Report Writing
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course teaches advanced skills for short to mid-length informational and analytical reports common to the school place. Students learn to research, interpret, organize, and critically evaluate information. There is an emphasis on solving problems, using evidence, making carefully informed decisions and realistic recommendations as well as adapting the message to the audience. The importance of document design, accurate documentation of sources, responsible use of rhetoric, and clear and purposeful writing are strongly promoted. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 3322 Studies in Linguistics and History of the English Language
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course examines the Linguistics and history of English from the prehistoric roots that bind it to other languages of Europe and Asia, through the period of its earliest attestation, and into the modern era. The course approaches the subject from the perspective of modern linguistics and also develops familiarity with the theory and analytical methods of this field. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 3323 Teaching Grammar, Composition, Spelling, and Listening
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on the preparation for teaching grammar, usage, punctuation, composition, spelling, critical thinking, and listening in secondary schools. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

ENGL 4324 Reading and Writing in the Secondary Classroom
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course is designed to instruct students in the teaching of reading and writing in the secondary classroom, with an emphasis on principles, trends, methods, materials, approaches and strategies. Based on theories of interactive language and writing development, the course presents methodology designed to help teachers develop literacy and comprehension abilities in the English Language Arts. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312

MATH R300 Fundamentals of Mathematics
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course reviews basic arithmetic skills and pre-algebra, and elementary algebra topics that are required for the College Algebra course. Prerequisite: None

MATH 1311 College Algebra
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course involves the study of linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and inverse functions; the theory and system of equations; complex numbers. Prerequisite: A score of 63 in Mathematics AccuPlacer Test.

MATH 1313 Pre-Calculus
Cr. 3. (3-0). With this course students will be prepared for Calculus I. Topics included are functions and models including powers, exponentials, logarithms, rational functions, analytical geometry, and a detailed study on trigonometric functions, an introduction to matrix operations, determinants, two dimensional vector analysis, and an introduction to series and limits that are necessary. Prerequisites: MATH 1311

MATH 2314 Calculus I
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course teaches Calculus of rational functions: limits, derivatives, applications of the derivative, indefinite integrals, definite integrals, mean value theorem, fundamental theorem of calculus, applications, and problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 1314

MATH 2315 Calculus II
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course teaches Calculus of transcendental functions: methods of integration and applications of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: MATH 2314

MATH 2316 Linear Algebra
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, and determinants. Prerequisite: MATH 1311

MATH 2317 Discrete Mathematics
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course introduces basic concepts of mathematics and mathematical reasoning and provides an introduction to discrete concepts such as finite sets and structures, and their properties and applications. Topics include, but are not restricted to principals of counting, combinatorics, logic, sets, relations, functions, induction and other methods of proof, recursion, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 1311

MATH 3318 Geometry and Trigonometry in Math Education
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course delves into Euclidean geometry-axioms and proofs, lines and triangles; trigonometric functions and the study of transformations-translations, rotations, reflections, dilations and symmetry. The curriculum also covers coordinate geometry, vectors and matrices, non-Euclidean geometry and problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 1311

MATH 3319 Statistics and Probability
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course is an overview of probability and statistics. Topics included are probability theory, random variables, discrete and continuous random variables, the central limit theorem, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MATH 2315

MATH 3320 Differential Equation
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations of first order, higher order linear equations, Laplace transform methods. There are three main aspects we will be concerned with: 1) how to solve them, 2) how to interpret the solutions, and 3) how to apply them to solve real world problems. Prerequisite: MATH 2315

MATH 3322 Teaching Problem Solving in Math
Cr. 3. (3-0) This course introduces techniques of teaching mathematics to produce deeper levels of conceptual and procedural understanding.  Topics include the methodology of absorbing new ideas, efficient and accurate calculation, the formulation of alternate solutions; and addressing the five critical mathematical processes, which include communication and problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 2315

MATH 4324 Teaching Secondary School Math
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on methods, techniques and evaluative instruments applicable to the teaching of secondary school mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 2315

MATH 2325 History of Mathematics
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course provides a college-level experience in mathematics and its history. Students will discover the development of important mathematical topics such as algebra, calculus and probability; be familiar with the contribution of famous mathematicians to mathematics and recognize the impact of their discoveries on history; understand the mathematical influences on the sciences; apply ancient techniques of problem solving to gain an appreciation for the current state of mathematics and to discover how different cultures have affected the development of mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 1311

MATH 3326 Number Theory
Cr. 3. (3-0).  This course introduces prime numbers and the fundamental theorem of arithmetic. Topics include, but are not limited to induction, well-ordering, division algorithm, Euclidean algorithm, number theoretic functions and congruences. Prerequisite: None

MATH 3327 Integrating Technology in Math Education
Cr. 3. (3-0). An introduction to technology appropriate for the mathematics classroom, including calculators, CAS systems, handhelds, computer software and multimedia. This course is intended for pre-service mathematics teachers at the middle/high school level. Prerequisite: None

PSYC 2311 General Psychology
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on the nature of psychology with emphases on the study of personality development, decision making, reactions to frustration, mental health, and how the individual interacts with and is influenced by others. Prerequisite: None

SOCI 2313 Introduction to Sociology
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on sociological perspectives including concepts and methods; social class and social status, the family, minorities, crime, religion, power, urbanization and population. Prerequisite: None

GEOG 2311 Introduction to Human Geography
Cr.3. (3-0). This course aims to provide a broad introduction to the field of geography as a social science. The concepts and methods of geography will be employed to examine the following topics: the relationship between people and their environments; the importance of culture in influencing activities; the factors affecting spatial interaction and location; and global patterns of economic development. The relevance of the geographic approach in understanding a range of contemporary problems will also be considered. Prerequisite: GEOL 1411 for social studies major students

GEOG 2312 Regional Geography of the World
Cr.3. (3-0). This course introduces the survey course that emphasizes the human and physical geography of the world’s major regions. Each region is surveyed as to its location and component countries and peoples, world importance, distinctive physical and cultural characteristics, relations to other areas of the world, and the major problems and potentialities associated with each. Prerequisite: GEOL 1411 for social studies major students

GEOG 3313 Geography of US and Canada
Cr.3. (3-0). This course provides a systematic and regional analysis of the United States and Canada with emphasis on contemporary economic, environmental, political and social issues. Prerequisite: GEOL 1411 for social studies major students

GOVT 2311 U.S. Government I
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course on the Constitution and Government of the United States examines the institutional structures of government at national and state levels, including the legislative process, executive and bureaucratic structures, and the judiciary systems. Prerequisite: None

GOVT 3312 U.S. Government II
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course on the constitution of Texas and state, county, and municipal governments examines the constitutions of the State of Texas and the United States, federalism and intergovernmental relations, local government, and the political process. Note: Students transferring their government course work from out-of-state must enroll in this course to complete the Texas legislative requirement. Prerequisite: GOVT 2311 for social studies major students

HIST 1311 U.S. History I
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course is a general survey of United States history from the discovery of the continent to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Prerequisite: None

HIST 2312 U.S. History II
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course is a general survey of United States history from 1877 to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 1311 for social studies major students

HIST 2313 Western Civilization
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course is an overview of the origins and development of what is known as Western Civilization, from its ancient beginnings up to the era of the Renaissance and Reformation. Western Civilization refers to the civilization that began in the ancient Near East and then developed primarily in Europe, northern Africa and the westernmost edges of Asia. The cultural and political legacy of this civilization is vast and has become predominant in much of the world. Prerequisite: HIST 1311 for social studies major students

HIST 3314 History of Texas
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course is a survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and intellectual development of Texas from the period of Spanish discovery to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 1311 for social studies major students

SOCS 4311 Concepts for Teaching the Social Science
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course aims to prepare students for the secondary social studies, the awareness of the importance of professionalism, exploring and practicing a variety of teaching strategies and activities, and the skills of planning, questioning, classroom management and assessment. The course will help students to develop skills and procedures to create positive learning opportunities that reflect understanding of the unique characteristics of young adolescents. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 2311 Introduction to Teaching Profession
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course introduces prospective teachers as well as other education students to the teaching profession. Presenting both historical and current views of teaching and education, this course encourages students to think more deeply, broadly, and systematically about what teaching is, what teachers do, and whether teaching is an appropriate career choice for them. In the course students will develop research and theory-based views of educational history, teaching practices, various contexts of teaching and teachers, and contemporary issues related to teacher education. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 2312 Learning Theories and Development
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course analyzes learning and development theories and their implications for learning and teaching.  It examines factors that impact and facilitate learning, as well as instructional strategies that support the cognitive, social, and emotional development of learners. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 3314 Classroom Management
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course teaches effective classroom management with an emphasis on helping students become self-regulated learners; i.e. the application of various management techniques to help students become more responsible for their behaviors and choices.  Theories and diverse strategies related to effective classroom management will be discussed. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 3315 Curriculum and Instructional Design
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on the design of instruction, in particular on the theory and method of design based on congruence between identified needs and approaches to curriculum development. Topics include curricular design models and the integral connection between curriculum, assessment, and instruction; strategies for curriculum alignment; investigation and application of research-based instructional strategies; and the use of technology to enhance instruction. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 3316 Integrating Technology into the Curriculum
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course examines the use of computers in the classroom and their impact on the learning environment.  Topics include selection of resources, materials, and strategies for systemic achievement of curriculum goals; investigation of innovative and effective technological advances; and practices for use in teaching and learning. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 3317 Education in Culturally Diverse Environments
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course offers perspectives on multicultural education in our schools today; on the appreciation of differences based on race, culture, ethnicity, and gender; and on how classroom practices can reflect a mature understanding of culturally diverse environments. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 4318 Education of Exceptional Children
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course examines educators’ responses to the needs of students with disabilities, those who are Limited English Proficient, and those who are academically or intellectually gifted. The focus is on differentiating and individualizing instruction for each student’s mental, physical, emotional, and vocational development in the least restrictive environment. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 4320 Issues Education – Reform, Law and Ethics
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course examines the key areas of educators’ legal and ethical responsibilities, such as equity in education, documentation, intellectual property, accommodations for the disabled, student privacy, confidentiality, and personal relations between teachers and students. Specific legal cases will be discussed. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 4321 Measurement and Assessment in Education
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course examines principles of educational measurement and evaluation in secondary schools.  Topics include test construction, test reliability and validity, item analysis, interpretation of test results, grading and reporting of educational achievement. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 4323 Reading in Content Areas
Cr. 3. (3-0). This course focuses on the development of reading skills and the interaction of readers with the text. Topics include the readability of curriculum materials, accommodating learning in light of students’ diverse reading abilities, and assessment of student learning. Prerequisite: None

EDUC 4699  Student Teaching
Cr. 6. (0-0). During practicum, student put into practice the skills they have gained in the Interdisciplinary Studies in Education program.


 

Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

  1. Compare/contrast and apply human development and learning theories.
  2. Design curriculum and instructional materials, and implement them in their profession.
  3. Integrate relevant technologies into education.
  4. Create positive learning environment by demonstrating professional classroom management and communication skills.
  5. Recognize responsibilities and ethical issues related to their profession.
  6. Develop content knowledge in their concentration.
  7. Improve pedagogical content knowledge in their concentration.
  8. Integrate relevant technologies into education.
  9. Create positive learning environment by demonstrating professional classroom management and communication skills.
  10. Recognize responsibilities and ethical issues related to their profession.
  11. Develop content knowledge in their concentration.
  12. Improve pedagogical content knowledge in their concentration.